Everything listed under: Art Bikes

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    Art Cars are Coming! 4.27.17 - 4.30.17

    While a fire may slow us down, it will not keep us from bringing art to the schools who need it most. Hold onto your hat, Art 120's 2017 Scenic City Art Car Weekend is April 28-30th, complete with a children's mini art car parade. 

    Help us make this extra special for the students of Hamilton County and Chattanooga by sponsoring a child for as little as $5. Click here and make a difference today!

    Art Car Weekend Public Schedule 

    Art Car Breakfast and Art-Car-A-Van to schools (Fri, Apr. 28, starting 7:30am, The Camp House)

    Art Car Tailgate Party and Art Show and STE(A)M Educators Workshop (Saturday, Apr. 29, 9am-5pm at the Tennessee Aquarium Park)

    Illuminated Art Cruise to The Pool (Saturday, Apr. 29, 8pm-10pm at East Lake Park)

    Potluck Breakfast and morning sendoff (Sunday, Apr. 30, 10am-noon at the Montague Sculpture Fields

    "Arthur Zarr's Amazing Art Car" Book-signing at Hamilton Place Barnes & Noble (Sunday, Apr. 30, 2-4pm)

    STEM Jubilee at TN Riverpark (Sunday, Apr. 30, noon-4pm)

  • Normal Park Gets The Art Bike Bug!

    We were so happy to help Emily Simpson, the Art Teacher from Normal Part Magnet School, work on her Hubble Space Telescope Art Bike project together with her students! We cannot wait to work on even more projects with Emily and her amazing students! We had a great opportunity to ask Emily a few questions about her process.

    1. What inspired you to make an Art Bike with your class?
    While I think it is important for my students to learn about the classics, I also think it is imperative for them to learn about contemporary artists and art practices. On top of that, I try to give my students opportunities to be involved in the art community whether it be in Chattanooga or somewhere further away as well as opportunities to work together as a team. Building an art bike would give them the chance to learn about a contemporary art practice, the chance to be involved in the flourishing local arts scene, and a peek into the realm of collaboration.

    2. What is the theme of your Art Bike, how did it come to fruition, and how did you work the creation of an Art Bike into your curriculum?
    At Normal Park Museum Magnet, a lot of what our students do in their related arts classrooms is directly tied to what they're learning in their classrooms. This gives them multiple opportunities to explore as well as solidify their learning and understand it in a new and/or deeper way. With that being said, in the art room, the students create based on the visual arts curriculum as well as their classroom curriculum. Our projects come to fruition through many collaborative opportunities that we have with the grade level teams. Through much research and collaboration, we decided to tie in parts of their science curriculum. At the time they were covering inventions in space, weather, magnets, force and motion, and sound. Hence our choice of space, weather, and sound as our themes.

    3. How have the kids responded to creating an art bike?
    My 3rd grade students were so intrigued by the idea. Kate came to talk to our students about art bikes and there were so many "ooo's" and "ahh's" when they were shown videos of the bikes being ridden. I can't tell you how many times I heard,"Woah, Ms. Simpson! How did they do that?!" It really peaked their interest. They were EXTREMELY curious and wondered how we were going to make our bike and when. They immediately had so many ideas. As they were working, the students responded very well to the sculptural processes. Some of them had never used a hammer or needle nose pliers before, but met the challenge head-on and succeeded!

    4. What has the process of creating your Art Bike been like?
    As teachers, we try to plan as much as humanly possible to insure the success of our students and our success in the classroom. I try to think about each project from a lot of different angles. Where will the students hit a "bump in the road"? What parts will be challenging? What material will be best suited for that process? The list could go on and on. I like to have a plan that is bullet proof. Well, in the art room things can sometimes shift trajectory at a moment's notice. This definitely happened with the art bike. Not only did the students experience more trial and error, but I experienced that as well which was a little uncomfortable for me. I like to have a plan. But, that's one of the perks of art education - learning how to fail and learning how to problem solve immediately following. It was a real treat to come alongside the students and problem solve together.

    The bike as a whole is being made to look like the Hubble Telescope. This decision came directly from some preliminary brainstorming and sketching sessions with my 3rd Grade Advanced Art students. If you have ever seen pictures of the Hubble telescope, there is a smooth section and a section with dimples in it. Some of the 3rd grade students hammered a large portion of a roll of aluminum flashing to add the same sort of texture seen on the outer layer of the telescope. Another class listened to a sound recording of a thunder clap and drew a visual representation of the sound in the form of a sound wave. The next day, another class came in and bent wire in the shape of the sound waves drawn by the previous class. There were also days when our main focus was solely cutting aluminum cans into 3 separate pieces in order for other classes to use them for mini satellites that would stick out from the art bike. One of the last things the students did was to spray paint the bike to look like outer space - specifically to represent one of the most well known composite pictures ever taken by the Hubble Telescope. Once the students created all of the "bits and pieces", it was then my turn to assemble, which means more problem solving, measuring, problem solving again, cutting and welding, which I love. I couldn't have done it without the help and expertise of the Art 120 crew. The bike is now in process of being assembled so that it can be ridden in the 2016 Art Car Parade!

    5. What has been the best part of creating an Art Bike?
    Pinpointing one favorite part is a real challenge. One of my most favorite moments, though, was seeing a student that isn't always so jazzed up about being in the art room stepping up and being a leader for the whole classroom. He ended up being one of the main problem solvers on how we would cut apart the aluminum cans and put them together to create the mini satellites. I loved seeing him so passionate about creating and teaching his classmates.

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    Help us win one for the community!

    Click Here!

    VOTE FOR ART 120 NOW THROUGH AUGUST 24TH!

    Help us win the ‪#GreaterRace2015‬ Wild Card entry which includes a shot @ $18,000.

    That's 3,600 kids we can serve and one great public art event for the city! All it takes is one click per day per device, no forms to fill out. So what are you waiting for, vote now!


  • Urban Art Bikes On A Roll This Summer!

    One of the most creative summer programs continues, Art 120 is thrilled to announce the 2015 Urban Art Bike Camp in July! For four years and teaching a total of 42 kids, it's exciting to bring another batch of kids into the fold, having them weld their overflowing imaginations into reality.


    Click here and fill out the application form for the Teacher Training Class

    Click here and Sign Up today for the Summer Art Bike Camp!

    Teacher Training Class

    Located inside Art 120's workshop, just off Main and Broad at 1511 Williams Street, Art 120 will be holding a special teacher training class beginning July 6th. The 7 day course runs Friday-Saturday and Monday-Friday from 9am to 5pm with an 1 hour break for lunch. Teachers will learn how to instruct a team through Art 120’s STEAM-based program using a variety of tools and techniques, including welding. To really provide a hands-on experience, teachers will work in teams to build an art bike of their own design just like our students.

    The cost for the class is $400 and includes all gear, supplies, and materials. Adults from all disciplines are encouraged to apply. If participants satisfy the requirements of the course and can commit to teaching, they will be eligible to receive a teaching stipend to offset their tuition depending on commitment and availability. Each teacher will be assigned a team of four youth and an assistant for the student program. There are only twelve slots available on a first come, first serve basis, so please register ASAP!

    To sign up, please click here and fill out the application form for the Teacher Training Class!

    Summer Art Bike Camp

    Concluding the teacher training class, the student Summer Art Bike Camp will begin! Students ages 11 -15 will work in teams to complete several art bike contraptions, learning about the art of sculpture, design, fabrication, engineering, problem solving, and introduction to welding. Students will also have the opportunity to participate with their created bikes in several public events throughout the year and share their creations with the community.

    The class will be from July 13th through the 24th, Monday to Friday, from 8AM to Noon. For those who apply by June 19th, the camp cost $400 per student. After June 19th, the price will be $500. This special, fee-based program not only teaches welding and engineering concepts, but also helps us provide more opportunities for underserved youth in the community.

    Click here and Sign Up today for the Summer Art Bike Camp!

  • Thanks Again Chattanooga! Art Cars Love You!

    Wow! What an amazing Art Car Weekend in Chattanooga! Once again local businesses, the city, and individuals stepped up to help us put on the best show yet while reaching just over 2,500 children in Hamilton County without an art program. Once all the data is collected for the entire weekend, we will share in next week's post. Until then, here are some wonderful photos before the ball. The Art Car Fire Ball was so amazing, we will have to post that separately next week.

  • Chattanooga, Start Your Art Cars!

    The Scenic City Art Car Weekend will be rolling into town May 8th & 9th. Registration is now open! Some of you out there may already have an amazing car, lowrider, or cool wheeled contraption. Or, you have an idea and are ready to give it a shot. Registration is open until April 24th. If you do not have an image yet, you can submit a sketch of your idea and debut it to the public on May 9th. Individuals, schools, businesses, and non-profit organizations can click here to apply! Schools can still register for the Art-Car-A-Van May 8th. Click here to enroll your school today!

  • Urban Art Bikes at Mainx24!

    Our urban art bike team will once again be part of Main Street's community celebration. On Saturday, December 6th, be on the lookout for your wildest dreams on wheels during The Mainx24 parade at 10:30am. After the parade, join us next to the Flying Squirrel on Passenger Street for rides and fun from noon to 4pm. Come out, Shoot some hoops with our basketball bike, ride a beast, and meet the kids that built these amazing creations in our Williams Street workshop.

    While you're there, donate $20 and grab a t-shirt. You can sport a cool design while getting some serious street cred for supporting our programs while supplies last!

  • A Tale of 2 Maker Faires and 1 Fire Tornado

    October was a busy month for our Urban Art Bikers. The kids from The Bethlehem Center attended Maker Faire Atlanta where they received a lot of positive feedback from thousands of attendees that stopped to try out their art bikes. The students also received three exhibit of merit awards for their creations. All in all, Atlanta’s Maker Faire had 30,000 people in attendance over the two day event.

    The following week, we were back in Chattanooga where kids from The Bethlehem Center and two of our Glass Street Students participated and shared their creations with a crowd of 2,200. Also on exhibit was Art 120’s first collaborative art piece with the community, Mr. Twister Fire Tornado. A big thanks to Siskin Steel for supplying all the metal and board member, Conrad Tengler for stepping up to the challenge along with artist Andrew Nigh, Mike Harrison, and Bryan Dyer. People really seemed to enjoy the sculpture and we will continue to work as a team to figure out our next steps with this really cool, bike powered piece.

    NEXT STOP: Mainx24!